Blog posts tagged “Web”

Making of A Brief Visual Exploration of A Dictionary of Typography
December 16, 2020

Not many people read a dictionary cover to cover, let alone analyze every word, but I did and found it fascinating. During research phases for my past restoration projects, I often came across a surprising number of antique dictionaries and always overlooked them. For this project, I actively sought out an interesting one to explore and ended up finding two to create A Brief Visual Exploration of A Dictionary of Typography.

Making of ATF Typesetter Model B
February 12, 2020

If you’ve ever found a tiny piece of obscure history and had it strike something in you that made you obsess over it for weeks, that’s how I felt when I found the brochure for the ATF Typesetter Model B. This small 16-page brochure from 1963 for an obsolete piece of typographical machinery piqued my interest so much that I wound up converting it into a one-page website as an exercise in design and technology. Plus, it was just plain fun.

Making of Goethe’s Colours
January 12, 2020

Figuring out how to put a new face on something old is never easy and devising a new way to look at Goethe’s Theory of Colours was no exception. What started as a relatively simple idea turned out to be more complex that I expected but the process was a good learning experience. The final result is fun too.

Making of Picturesque Views of Seats of Great Britain and Ireland
October 13, 2019

Castles and mansions and manors, oh my! The minute I saw Alexander Lydon’s illustrations in A Series of Picturesque Views of Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen of Great Britain and Ireland, I wanted to create something based on them. Picturesque Views of Seats of Great Britain and Ireland (or simply “Seats” for short) is the result.

Making of the Illustrations of the Natural Orders of Plants
July 9, 2019

If someone told me when I was young that I would spend three months of my time tracing nineteenth century botanical illustrations and enjoy it, I would have scoffed, but that’s what I did to reproduce Elizabeth Twining’s Illustrations of the Natural Orders of Plants and I loved every minute.

Making of Byrne’s Euclid
December 16, 2018

Creating a faithful online reproduction of a book considered one of the most beautiful and unusual publications ever published is a daunting task. Byrne’s Euclid is my tribute to Oliver Byrne’s most celebrated publication from 1847 that illustrated the geometric principles established in Euclid’s original Elements from 300 BC.

Making of Lunar Conversations
March 18, 2018

Finding a new set of data to play with is exciting. Figuring out what to do with it is a roller coaster ride of emotions ranging from amazement and intrigue to frustration and head-scratching. The transcript from the Apollo 11 mission was all of these and more for me.

Making of Color Palettes of The New Yorker
March 26, 2017

Generating color palettes of more than 4,600 covers of The New Yorker was a challenging task but when I get an idea stuck in my head I stubbornly like to see it through. What follows is a breakdown of how I made my Color Palettes of The New Yorker project including early ideas, methodologies, and technical details.

Visualizing Metra
August 14, 2011

When I heard that Metra was planning to cut 46 trains from its service in 2012 to make up for high operating costs, I wanted to see just how much of an impact that would have on their schedules—using a technique from 1885. How the final result came about was a mixture of curiosity and fun with a pinch of obsession.

Why I block ads
August 18, 2010

Ever since I found out I could block ads, I have. I've even gone out of my way to download Firefox extensions like Stylish to let me write my own styles that block ads not caught by AdBlock. I popped over to NBC Chicago's weather page to see the forecast for tonight and was painfully reminded that I had forgotten to re-enable AdBlock after disabling it for another project.

Fast Flip? Fast Flop.
September 14, 2009

Google's new Fast Flip, released Monday, is a way to visually browse the news in a new zippy way. Sure, it may be speedy but useful? Not quite.

Metra's new site: a review
September 10, 2009

Metra launched a new website this week and since I'm a commuter, designer, and collector, I felt compelled to share my reaction. Any change would have been an improvement to their old site, but while there were welcomed enhancements, not everything lived up to the hype.

Who uses fly-up menus?
August 9, 2009

The Weather Channel apparently does. I've only seen "fly-up" menus used on one other site that would have easily qualified for Worst Website Ever years ago and was amazed when I discovered they're now being used for the navigation on The Weather Channel's site.

Apple's clever counter
April 11, 2009

Apple's counting down to it's one billionth app downloaded and while that's amazing, what intrigued me wasn't the milestone but how they did that neat flipping effect with the counter. It's surprisingly simple.

Obama's online evolution
January 20, 2009

Barack Obama has had an amazing politcal ride and being a web designer, I thought it would be interesting to take stock of how his online presence has evolved as he has from a hopeful junior senator to our new president—with screenshots of course.

Google's Chrome needs polishing but is off to a good start
September 2, 2008

In case you haven't already heard, Google released Chrome today—its new browser built based on how the web is used today compared to several years ago. Considering its been in development for two years, it's amazing that knowledge about it has been limited to rumors until yesterday. After using it as my primary browser for an afternoon, I found several awesome and not-so-awesome parts.

Why I use a print program for web design
June 5, 2008

A recent post over on 37 Signals on why they skip Photoshop and head straight for the HTML and CSS portion of a design and a post by John Hicks on why he doesn't had me thinking about my own design methods.

Keep an eye on your markup
May 9, 2008

"How did that gap get there? Why aren't those lining up properly? Why is my browser crashing?" Sound familiar? Check your markup. How many hours have you spent sifting through code, only to find that little display quirk was caused by a missing </div> or </span> tag? Rest assured, if something looks wonky, it's probably the markup.

CSS variables on the horizon
April 9, 2008

Apple and Disruptive Innovations submitted a proposal today for CSS variables and I'm excited to see this first step taken. Having the ability to define variables in CSS is something I and just about every other designer have wanted for quite some time.

CSS Naked Day 2008
April 9, 2008

Like many sites around the world, I'm stripping the site for the third annual CSS Naked Day. It's a tribute to Web designers and Web standards. Without either, I wouldn't have a job!

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